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Malaysia – Chemerong-Berembun-Langsir (CBL)

20 Jun 19

Malaysia – Chemerong-Berembun-Langsir (CBL)

Chemerong-Berembun- Langsir (CBL) is, without a doubt, one of the most beautiful treks in West Malaysia. Located in Hulu Dungun, Terengganu, the crystal clear emerald green and turquoise pools gives this place the nickname of "Jiuzhaigou (Jiuzhai Valley) of Malaysia". The trek was first made famous by Chemorong Waterfall (370m)  - one of Malaysia’s highest waterfalls. The towering waterfall can be seen, from a distance, on the drive to the start point of the trek, and appears like a giant human figure close up. The hike to the waterfall is later combined with a trek to Gunung Berembun (1038m) and Langsir Waterfall (801m) to form the CBL trek.

There are two ultra-clean and pristine rivers on the CBL trail. At the lower part of the mountain, Sungai Chemerong runs all the way up to the impressive Chemerong Falls and past the beautiful Camp B and Camp Y. Further up, Sungai Langsir's brooks and streams starts from Gunung Berumbun all the way down to the breathtaking Langsir Falls .

The trail and campsites are so well maintained that hardly any trash can be found. There is almost NO mosquito, NO cockroach and No rat in the mountains.

To preserve and protect the mountains of its pristine conditions, the trekking permits are limited to only around 6o people a day. With only a small group of trekkers allowed on the mountain each day, the trek is hardly overcrowded, allowing trekkers to enjoy the beautiful trails and campsites without having to  jostle for space with a crowd.

About The Climb

The Chemerong-Berembun- Langsir (CBL) trek starts from the trail head at Hutan Lipur Chemerong to Chemerong Waterfall with a loop to Gunung Berembun and Langsir Waterfall. The total distance is around 27km. Trekkers can start and end from either side of the loop.

Our 3D/2N trek  starts from the trail head at Hutan Lipur Chemerong and follow the CLB route ...Chemerong-Langsir-Berembun. This route allows for a more leisurely trek with ample time to spend at each scenic spot and campsite.

Day 1 will bring us to the magnificent Chemerong Waterfall, after about an hour of walking on gradual tropical rain forest terrain from the trail head. Spend some splashing good time at the waterfall and have a picnic lunch. The trek to Kem Balak (Camp B campsite) from Chemerong Waterfall, is another short walk of about 2 hours. This section is a steep vertical ascend that require some scrambling, passing Seraya Besar (Big Tree / Y junction point) along the way. Go for a "fish spa" in the crystal clear Sungai Chemerong by Kem Balak while waiting for dinner. Enjoy star gazing once the night falls and, if you are lucky, spot some fireflies.

Day 2 is a slightly longer day of around 3.5-4 hours of trekking. The terrain is more undulating, with river/stream crossings, rather than steep vertical ascend. There are more scenic spots along the way, such as the turquoise pool of Sungai Bangan Balu and Bongsai area. There is a short section of steep uphill after crossing Sungai Bangan Balu to the Bongsai area, before the terrain becomes more gradual leading to yet another beautiful campsite at Langsir Waterfall. After settling in at the Langsir campsite, visit and have a dip at the multi-tiered emerald green Jeram Lesung pools. In the evening, head down to the rocks area of the Langsir campsite for sunset view before heading back up to the campsite for dinner and another night of star gazing.

Day 3 is the longest and toughest day of the trek. The start of the day is a short walk along Sungai Langsir to Jeram Lesung pools, before the steep uphill ascent of about 200m to the top of Gunung Berembun. This section will take around 1-1.5 hours. The descent from Gunung Berembun to the trail head is the loop to Big Hole Tree and Kem Y. After Kem Y, the loop will eventually lead back to Kem Balak (Day 1's campsite). The estimated timing to reach Kem Balak is around lunch time for a lunch break before moving on. From Kem Balak, it is another 45mins to 1 hour walk to the trail head, passing Seraya Besar (Big Tree / Y junction point) again, but skipping the detour to Chemerong Waterfall, for a shorter descent route out to the trail head to end the 3 days of scenic trek.

After the trek, we will drive to the idyllic seaside town of Kuantan to spend a night and enjoy a sumptuous seafood dinner, as well as, chill and relax, before the long drive back to Singapore the next day.

Experience Required

Good to have some tropical rain forest or below 2000m trekking experience. Anyone with a reasonable level of fitness can complete this trek and have an enjoyable time. You will be trekking for 4-6hrs daily, with a 5-6kg day pack, in tropical rainforest mountain terrain, crossing some rivers and camping for 3 days/2 nights.

Equipment and Gear

You can wear a quick dry t-shirt, sports shorts/tights or trekking pants and trail shoes. Bring rain gear, a light jacket/sweater and long pants for the night and waterproof your backpack. You will need to bring a lightweight/tropical sleeping bag and sleeping mat too. Drinking water is from the river by the campsites. For those with sensitive stomach, good to bring water purifying tablets or water filter.

Available Dates Price Qty*
20-23 Jun 2019 (with Trip Leader) $490.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
12-15 Sep 2019 (with Trip Leader) $490.00 (SGD)  / person  

* You can register up to 12 participants in one go.


Register Now

Group size: 8-11 people

DayDescriptionMealsAltitude at Rest Point
Night 112am: Meet up and board vehicle to Terengganu. -/-/-
Day 1-3Arrive Terengganu around 8am. Breakfast stop. Continue to drive to trail head. After meet up with local guide and registration, start 3D/2N trek. Overnight in Kuantan on Day 3B/-/D (except for day 1 breakfast)Kem Balak - 400m
Langsir - 800m
Kuantan - 22m
Day 4Depart from Kuantan around 1pm and drive back to Singapore.B/-/-

Inclusions

  • Chartered air-conditioned coach
  • Meals as indicated in itinerary
  • Accommodation: 1 night at local 3* hotel in Kuantan (twin/triple sharing), 2 nights camping in open tents (5 trekkers to 1 open tent)
  • Trek support: Trek leader (first aid responder + experience with good track records in leading Malaysia treks) and local trekking guide(s)
  • Permits & fees: trek permit
  • Safety management and first aid support
  • Travel insurance @S$18 (Can be deducted if you have your own)

Exclusions

  • Visa (if required)
  • Meals not indicated in itinerary
  • Drinking water and beverages
  • Personal expenses during the trip –  packed lunch, soft drinks, souvenirs etc
  • Personal hiking & travel gear - sleeping bag and sleeping mat etc
  • Emergency evacuation and medical expenses
  • Compensation for damaged or lost of personal items (eg: climbing/trekking gear and equipment, cameras and any valuable items etc)
  • Any expenses including accommodation, meals & transfer outside the stipulated trek/climb itinerary – i.e. any person leaving the group for personal travel, illness/injury or any form of extension of stay
  • Any expenses including meals & transfer outside the stipulated itinerary

Grading: 1B

Training: Regardless of your level of fitness and physical conditions, it is advisable to train prior to embarking on a trekking or mountain climbing trip.

Pure cardiovascular fitness is NOT enough.

Focus your training effort in the following areas, assuming that you are in good health and injury-free:

  1. Climbing conditioning – stairs and load training.
  2. Cardio training - Jogging/running and interval training like CrossFit or HIIT.
  3. Strength training for the lower body, shoulder, back and core
  4.  Flexibility training - eg: Yoga and stretching exercises

A good one-two month of training would be a good preparation for this trek.

A recommended training guide specific to the trek or climb will be given to you upon signing up.

Refer to our Grading chart for an overview on the technical difficulty and fitness required for this trek.

Refer to our Training Guide for tips on trekking and mountain climbing training.

Available Dates Price Qty*
20-23 Jun 2019 (with Trip Leader) $490.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
12-15 Sep 2019 (with Trip Leader) $490.00 (SGD)  / person  

* You can register up to 12 participants in one go.


Register Now
  • 20-23 Jun 2019
    June 20, 2019 - June 23, 2019
  • 12-15 Sep 2019
    September 12, 2019 - September 15, 2019

[…]

Malaysia – Mt Ophir

14 Jul 18

Malaysia – Mt Ophir

Mt Ophir (1276m) is located near a small town called Sagil within the Gunung Ledang National Park in Tangkak District, Johor, Malaysia. The summit is the highest point in Johor and situated between the border of Muar and Malacca. It is one of the most popular day trek destination with hikers from Singapore, as well as, the locals living in Johor, Malacca and Kuala Lumpur. The summit offers spectacular view and the Straits of Malacca.

At 1276m above sea level, it is the highest mountain in Johore. Being so near to Singapore, it is one of the most popular day trek destination with hikers from Singapore. A trek to the summit can be very challenging for those new to hiking and a good level of fitness will be required. Some of the steepest portion have ropes or ladders to assist the hikers, a daunting task for those afraid of height. A round trip to the summit & back would take about 9hrs or more, therefore it will be important for day trippers to start early in order not to be caught in the dark on the descent.

About The Climb

Mt Ophir is one of the more challenging day trek among the mountains in West Malaysia.

Our Mt Ophir itinerary starts with a 4am pre-dawn 2.5hrs to 3hrs drive to Mt Ophir's foothill. The aim is to reach the foothill by 7-30am and start trekking by 8-830am. After meeting the local guides and settling all the pre-climb arrangements at the National Park Office, we will start trekking.

Our trek to the summit is via the main Lagenda trail.

There are 8 Check Points on the Lagenda trail to the summit with a split route after CP3. We will trek from CP1 to CP3 and take the more direct route up to CP5 and KFC (Killing Fitness Centre), skipping the longer diversion to the right, eastward to CP4.

The route starts from the National Park Office with a series of concrete steps to gradual rainforest terrain from CP1 (Bukit Semput) to CP2 (Hentian Meranti) to Cp3 (Batu Orkid). The steep and challenging sections are all after CP3.

After CP3, the trail gets steeper with the need to use ladders and ropes in certain sections. Skipping Cp4, the next check point is at CP5 (Sg Segi Tiga), which is also a water point, where the local guides and some hikers will gather water from the stream to drink. Then comes the KFC (Killing Fitness Centre) - the infamous stretch of Mount Ophir, where ladders are in place to help hikers clear the steep section to reach CP6 (Gua Kambing). And, the challenges continue after CP6 with boulders and rockfaces to clear! A series of seemingly endless ladders and ropes will bring us past Batu Hampar and Taman Bonsai to reach CP7 (Bukit Botak). From CP7, the summit at CP8 (Puncak Mahligai) is a short distance away past dense lalangs and a final short section of ladders.

At the summit, the telecommunication tower in the next summit and view of the Straits of Malacca is visible on a clear day.

After a quick lunch break and enjoying the view at the summit, we start our descend, which will take another 4 to 6 hours. The ascend is around 5-6 hours.

Have a quick wash up at the foothill, followed by dinner in Tangkak town, before driving to Malacca to check-in to a hotel for a well deserved rest.

To lower the risk of having to rush back to Singapore past midnight, we stay in Malacca for 1 night after the trek. Trekkers can enjoy the good food, massage and Jonker Street etc in Malacca before heading back to Singapore the following day.

The next day, i.e. Sunday morning after breakfast, it is be a free & easy time to explore Malacca town before boarding the transport at 3pm for Singapore. Depending on the jam at the immigration check point, the  group will arrive back in Singapore at about 8pm.

Update on the cut-off time (COT)
Y-Junction (before CP5): 10.30am
CP7: 12.30pm
Trekkers to arrive at the summit not later than 1.30pm

Experience Required

Good to have some tropical rainforest or below 2000m trekking experience. You will be trekking for 8 to 9hrs with a 4-5kg day pack on mostly vertical terrain. The terrain from Cp3 to CP8 is steep and challenging, mainly huge boulders and rock faces, with many ladders and ropes to clear.

Equipment and Gear

You can wear a quick dry t-shirt, sports shorts/tights or trekking pants and trail shoes. Bring rain gear and waterproof your backpack.

Available Dates Price Qty*
14-15 Jul 2018 $240.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
16-17 Mar 2019 $240.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
13-14 Jul 2019 $265.00 (SGD)  / person  

* You can register up to 12 participants in one go.


Register Now

Group size: 10 - 12 people

DayItinerary
Day 13:30am: Meet Up. Board vehicle to Malaysia.

6:30am: Breakfast in Tangkak.

730am: Arrive at Mt Ophir foothill, meet local guides, registration & start trek to summit.

1pm-1.30pm: Arrive summit. After a quick lunch and photo taking at the summit, start the descend to the foothill. (The turn around time is at 1pm)

5pm-6pm: Arrive at foothill. Change / Wash up. Board vehicle to Malacca for overnight.
Day 2Free & easy in Malacca.

3pm: Board transport and drive back to Singapore.

8-9pm: Arrive in Singapore.

Inclusions

  • Chartered air-conditioned mini-van
  • 1 x trek leader (first aid responder + experience with good track records in leading Malaysia treks)
  • Trekking guide(s) (1 guide to 7 trekkers)
  • Permit fee
  • Packed lunch for the trek (prepared by the national park)
  • Accommodation:  1 x night in hotel in Malacca (twin/triple  sharing)
  • Safety management and first aid support
  • Travel insurance @S$18 (Can be deducted if you have your own)

Exclusions

  • Visa fee (if any)
  • All meals (packed lunch during the trek is provided)
  • Single supplement
  • All tipping
  • Drinking water and beverages
  • Summit certificate (can be purchased at RM15 per certificate after the climb at the Npark's office)
  • Personal expenses during the trip –  shower fee, soft drinks, souvenirs etc
  • Personal hiking & travel gear
  • Compensation for damage or lost of personal items (eg: climbing/trekking gear and equipment, cameras and any valuable items etc)
  • Emergency evacuation and medical expenses
  • Extra expenses incurred for change of itinerary

Grading: 2A

Training: Regardless of your level of fitness and physical conditions, it is advisable to train prior to embarking on a trekking or mountain climbing trip.

Pure cardiovascular fitness is NOT enough.

Focus your training effort in the following areas, assuming that you are in good health and injury-free:

  1. Climbing conditioning – stairs and load training.
  2. Cardio training - Jogging/running and interval training like CrossFit or HIIT.
  3. Strength training for the lower body, shoulder, back and core
.
  4.  Flexibility training - eg: Yoga and stretching exercises

A good 2 months of training would be a good preparation for this trek.

Refer to our Grading chart for an overview on the technical difficulty and fitness required for this trek.

Refer to our Training Guide for tips on trekking and mountain climbing training.

Available Dates Price Qty*
14-15 Jul 2018 $240.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
16-17 Mar 2019 $240.00 (SGD)  / person   Expired
13-14 Jul 2019 $265.00 (SGD)  / person  

* You can register up to 12 participants in one go.


Register Now
  • 13-14 Jul 2019
    July 13, 2019 - July 14, 2019

[…]

2nd Highest in Malaysia – Trus Madi

Yippy! I have finally trek up to Trus Madi in Sabah.

Trus Madi is 2,642m above sea level – the 2nd highest peak in Sabah and also the 2nd highest peak in Malaysia (West & East). It lies on the same range as Mt Kinabalu, the Crocker Range. The Trus Madi Forest Reserve is bordered by three districts – Ranau, Tambunan and Keningau.  Trus Madi can be accessed from this three districts, we will begin our journey from Tambunan. Tambunan is a small town south of Mt Kinabalu.

We arrived in Kota Kinabalu (KK) airport on Silk Air flight, Silk Air arrives in KK at noon, giving us sufficient time to travel to Tambunan town, 80km in distance, about 1.5hrs drive on private van. East of Tambunan is Trus Madi. We stayed at TRCC – Tandarason Resort Country Club – though not quite the expected resort, it is relaxing and secluded.

Vincinity around TRCC

TRCC vicinity

Sunset at TRCC

Sunset view from TRCC

The next day, we hopped onto a 4WD and off we went for a 1.5hrs not-so-bumpy ride to the Trus Madi Forest Reserve check point gate.

Trus Madi Gate

The “butterfly” gate – Trus Madi Forest Reserve check point

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4900m = 4.9km = distance from trail head to summit

After making verification on our permit, we moved on with our 4WD for another 20mins to the trail head. The route after the check point is steeper and hence we had a really bumpy ride. The trail head is anchored with a hut, and a few sign boards that give information about the trek to Trus Madi summit. There is a sign board indicating “4900m” , it is a distance marker, and there are also distance marker along the trail to the mountain hut. The total distance is 4.9km, from trail head to the summit. Here, the altitude is about 1,800m*. We have traveled 27km from Tambunan town, where TRCC is located.

*My alti-meter was later re-calibrated at the summit with a GPS. The trail head should be about 1,600m +/-

Trail head of Trus Madi (1,800m a.s.l)

Trail head of Trus Madi (1,800m a.s.l)

From the trail head to the mountain hut, it is a series of board walk leading to the mountain hut. It took us about 45mins to reach the mountain hut, some trekkers may take a shorter time, on an average, a leisure walk would be between 40mins and 1hr.  The newly constructed board walk made the trek so much easier. When we look below the board walk, the old trail could be seen; steep rocky roots and narrow path. No wonder it was said to be tougher trekking here (before the renovation) than trekking in Mt Kinabalu.

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The mountain hut at 2,100m above sea level. About 2km from trail head.

The mountain hut offers good (because it is still new for now) basic facilities – dormitory beds with sleeping bags (tropical), slippers, toilets. You can also choose to shower if there is sufficient water. Water is mainly reserved for cooking and drinking. With this newly renovated facilities, trekkers no longer need to carry camping accessories that weigh them down on the approach trek. Like climbing Mt Kinabalu, trekkers’ carrying pack would likely not heavier than 8kg. If you are a minimalist trekker, you will be smiling from cheek to cheek on this trek.

The summit trek starts from the mountain hut. We set off at 2:20am. We arrived at the 2000m distance marker at about 3am. Unlike Mt Kinabalu’s clear and easy path, the terrain requires plenty of high steps and scrambling, some segments are fixed with ladders and ropes to help with the climb. The enchanting pitcher plants made the trek more interesting.

IMG_1949 IMG_1952 IMG_1953The trek from the 2000m distance marker is walking on ridge line, still rich in flora and fauna, with a series of up and down hill. Like in other mountains, the last push to the summit is always enduring. We arrived at the summit at about 530am. The sunrise view was breathtaking. We also enjoyed a panoramic view of Mt Kinabalu.

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View of Mt Kinabalu from the summit of Trus Madi (approximately 40km north)

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On the summit of Trus Madi. Photo credit: Prasanna Srinivasan

On the summit of Trus Madi. Photo credit: Prasanna Srinivasan

We made our way back to the mountain hut, and eventually descent to the trail head. Took 4WD out to TRCC and transfer to Kota Kinabalu town the same day. The day light unveiled the beautiful dense forest of Trus Madi, along the way, we witnessed the Crocker mountain range through the pockets of forest window.

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Summit certificates

Summit certificates

With the newly renovated mountain cabin and established board walk that covers up to 2km, Trus Madi’s trek is less demanding as it was before. Many who have scaled Trus Madi before the major renovation in 2011 reported that Trus Madi is tougher to climb than Mt Kinabalu. Now that I have experienced the trail on Trus Madi, my conclusion is that it is difficult to make accurate comparison between Trus Madi and Mt Kinabalu. While I agree that Trus Madi is “tougher” to climb than Mt Kinabalu, the “toughness” of both mountains are somewhat different.  Both mountains offer differing challenges. To help you understand better about the differences, I have identified two key points for comparison – Altitude, Terrain:

1. Altitude

Mt Kinabalu’s main challenge is in the altitude and it can be really cold from Laban Rata (est. 3,200m) onwards. Trus Madi is about half the height of Mt Kinabalu, there is almost no risk of mountain sickness, the cold is more manageable though wind at the summit can still post a threat. The trail head at Mt Kinabalu starts at 1,800m and Trus Madi starts at about 1,600m above sea level. The mountain huts on Mt Kinabalu is located at 3,200m, while Trus Madi’s mountain hut is located at 2,100m. This makes climbing Mt Kinabalu more breathless than Trus Madi, and chances of getting mountain sickness is higher on Mt Kinabalu. With the disparity in height, Mt Kinabalu’s trek distance from trail head is 8.5km while Trus Madi is 4.9km, Trus Madi is definitely less physically demanding to trek compared to Mt Kinabalu.

2. Terrain

Before renovation work on Trus Madi between 2011 and 2013, the trail up to the mountain hut was very adventurous and strenuous. It was also said to be not suited for the faint hearted, only for hard core trekkers. The dense forest trek involved walking on narrow trails and big trees with roots that required plenty of scrambling with hands. The hut on Trus Madi was less than basic, trekkers had to carry tents & other camping accessories to camp overnight for the summit climb. Trekkers also had to walk 2km on logging road before arriving at the trail head at 1,600m. Upon completion of the renovation work and reopen for climbing in 2013, Trus Madi’s mountain hut access point has greatly improved and made easy. The trail head can be reached by 4WD, and the trek up to the mountain hut is now on board walk, making the terrain similar or easier than Mt Kinabalu, but still there is a fair bit of vertical walking to be done. While Mt Kinabalu’s trail is well established and has clear path all the way up to the highest point, Trus Madi’s summit trail is more interesting and still as demanding. One needs to be a sure footer to do well in this trek; and the comfort level during the trek is also way lower as compared to trekking in Mt Kinabalu (such as higher humidity in Trus Madi).

In summary, the route to Trus Madi summit is far more challenging than Mt Kinabalu, though the air is richer with oxygen. It is a mountain worth an attempt. If you enjoy trekking in the west Malaysia mountains, you will enjoy and appreciate Trus Madi even more. There are many reasons you should trek up to Trus Madi:

  1. The peak is below 3,000m, hard to come by in our region;
  2. You get to enjoy the serenity in Tambunan and at the mountain hut;
  3. It can be done in four days like Mt Kinabalu, including flying in and out of Kota Kinabalu;
  4. Permit is easy to secure as it is less crowded; (at least for now, so climb it soon before it gets overly crowded)
  5. There is no need to carry heavy load to trek;
  6. The view from the summit is awesomely beautiful! (Ok, difficult to guarantee on this point, you sure need some luck 😛 )
  7. Probably the most important of all, you get to shower before and after your summit trek! 😀

Contact us to arrange for a trek to Trus Madi. Email to Contact@aceadventure.com.sg

Hooray to more short treks!

~ Joanne Soo

Via Ferrata on Mt Kinabalu

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Mount Kinabalu is a prominent mountain on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. It is well climbed by people around the world, including Singaporeans. The highest point on Mount Kinabalu is called Low’s Peak; it lies on the Crocker Range and is the highest mountain in the Malay Achipelago.

IMG_4429Mount Kinabalu never fails to awe me. I had first climbed it in 1996, and thereafter, I returned to the mountain several times. In 2009, I participated in the Mount Kinabalu Climbathon, and a month after I spent one week on the same mountain to explore the beautiful peaks, engaged in rock climbing and Via Ferrata. It was a rejuvenating experience.

What draws me to return to Mount Kinabalu again and again? It is the scenic views, the fresh air, the elevation, the people, and the idea of getting away from hustling and bustling city life. It is that simple.

I spent a few days on Via Ferrata and I really enjoyed it. It was thrilling, and I must admit, it was scary at first. Frankly, if anything is too easy, you won’t be challenged to do it.

 

So what is Via Ferrata?

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Via Ferrata (Italian for “iron road”) is a protected climbing route found in the Alps and certain other locations.

The origins of Via Ferrata date back to the nineteenth century, but Via Ferratas are strongly associated with the First World War, when several were built in the Dolomite mountain region of Italy to aid the movement of troops. However, many more have been developed in recent years, as their popularity has grown and the tourism benefits have become recognised.

The essence of a modern Via Ferrata is a steel cable which runs along the route and is periodically (every 3 to 10 metres) fixed to the rock. Using a Via Ferrata kit, climbers can secure themselves to the cable, limiting any fall. The cable can also be used as aid to climbing, and additional climbing aids, such as iron rungs (stemples), pegs, carved steps and even ladders and bridges are often provided. Thus via ferrata allow otherwise dangerous routes to be undertaken without the risks associated with unprotected scrambling and climbing or need for climbing equipment (e.g. ropes).

Via Ferrata enable the relatively inexperienced a means of enjoying the dramatic positions and accessing difficult peaks normally the preserve of the serious mountaineer; although, as there is a need for some equipment, a good head for heights and basic technique, Via Ferrata can be seen as a distinct step up from ordinary mountain walking. Conversely, the modest equipment requirements, ability to do them solo, and potential to cover a lot of ground, mean that Via Ferrata can also appeal to more experienced climbers.

Via Ferrata can vary in length from short routes taking less than an hour, to long, demanding alpine routes covering significant distance and altitude (1,000 metres or more of ascent), and taking eight or more hours to complete.  You don’t have to go to Italy to experience Via Ferrata. The nearest to Singapore, and will not cost you a bomb, is on Mount Kinabalu in Sabah, Malaysia.

Mount Kinabalu has the world’s highest Via Ferrata at 3,800m above sea level. You trek to the summit of Borneo’s highest peak – Low’s Peak and descent using Via Ferrata; you get the combination of trekking on the traditional route up to the peak and enjoy scenic view from the Crocker Range on Via Ferrata.

MOUNTAIN TORQ PHOTOS

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

 

There are 2 types of routes on Via Ferrata that you can choose from.

1. Walk the Torq (WTT)

This is a shorter and simpler version of the Via Ferrata and can be completed leisurely within 2-3 hours. Length of route is only 430m. You’ll get to try out a few obstacles such as the 2 cable Monkey bridge & Balancing beam.

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

2. Low’s Peak Circuit (LPC)

This is the more challenging and tougher route. The distance is about 1.2km, almost 3 times longer than the “Walk the Torque” route. You’ll need an estimated 4-6 hours to complete this. The low peak circuit will eventually connect to the walk the torque and hence you won’t miss out on anything.

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

 

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

Photo credit: MOUNTAIN TORQ

You don’t have to be a super human to climb a mountain, not to mention to experience Via Ferrata. There will be a practical training session before you make an attempt on the Via Ferrata. From training to the actual attempt, the entire process will be conducted and supervised by Mountain Torq Ferrata Trainers. Having scaled a couple of 8000m peaks and a climbing instructor myself, I am impressed with the Trainers’ dedication to safety and the welfare of the trekkers. Because the safety aspect was already taken care of, I could focus on creating my own new experiences on Mt Kinabalu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can sign up for Via Ferrata based on the number of days you want to spend in the mountains. Here are your options:

4D/3N Via Ferrata Walk-The Torq (WTT)

Day 1 Arrive at Kota Kinabalu town. Overnight at 3* Hotel Meals on your own
Day 2 Transfer to Kinabalu Park HeadquarterStart your trek to Pendent HutOvernight at Pendent Hut Packed Lunch / Dinner*Breakfast on your own
Day 3 Summit climb – VF WTT – descend to Park HeadquarterTransfer to Kota Kinabalu townOvernight at 3* Hotel Supper before summit climb / Breakfast after summit climb*Lunch & Dinner on your own
Day 4 Depart Kota Kinabalu Breakfast
Cost: 2 pax – S$690 per pax
3 pax – S$620 per pax
4-9 pax – S$590 per pax

You can upgrade from VF Walk The Torq to 5D/4N VF Low’s Peak Circuit (LPC) with a top up fee at S$260 per pax

Day 1 Arrive at Kota Kinabalu town. Overnight at 3* Hotel Meals on your own
Day 2 Transfer to Kinabalu Park HeadquarterStart your trek to Pendent HutOvernight at Pendent Hut Packed Lunch / Dinner*Breakfast on your own
Day 3 Summit climb – VF LPC – Pendent HutOvernight at Pendent Hut Supper before summit climb/ Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner
Day 4 Descend to Park HeadquarterTransfer to Kota Kinabalu town. Overnight at 3* Hotel Breakfast
Day 5 Depart Kota Kinabalu Breakfast
Cost: 2 pax – S$690 per pax + S$260 per pax
3 pax – S$620 per pax + S$260 per pax
4-9 pax – S$590 per pax + S$260 per pax

Do contact me or my colleagues at Ace Adventure Expeditions for your Via Ferrata climb on Mt Kinabalu.  You can pick your preferred dates to travel; we will assist you with all the other arrangement. Email us at contact@aceadventure.com.sg

Why we climb

Climb ON!

Joanne Soo
ACE ADVENTURE EXPEDITIONS
 
Source:
wikipedia.org/wiki/Via_ferrata
Mount Kinabalu Ferrata

Scheduled Trips – Update

Here is a list of our scheduled trips. Email us for trip details: contact@aceadventure.com.sg

Scheduled Trips Update 2

 

Mount Rinjani – 3726m, Lombok, Indonesia

4-9 August / 6-11 September

S$590 / pax (no expedition leader)

Rinjani Grp 2 (77)

Rinjani’s towering volcanic presence dominates the entire Indonesian island of Lombok.  Within its huge crater, surrounded by a complex of jagged peaks and smoking fissures, lies a stunning emerald-green caldera lake said by locals to be the home of the goddess Anjani.  The strenuous climb to the summit culminates in a breathtaking view that takes in the tropical idylls of Bali and Sumbawa as well as the winding coast and green valleys of Lombok.

 

Gunung Datuk – 885m, Malaysia

20-21 September

S$120 / pax (with an expedition leader)

Datuk 1

Gunung Datuk is located near the town Rembau in Negeri Sembilan.  At 885m above sea level, it is the highest peak in Negeri Sembilan.

It is a popular mountain for day tripper, the trail up is not too difficult and a round trip to the rocky summit and back would take about 4 to 5hrs. It has an interesting summit made of huge rocks, with some metal ladders put up to enable climbers to get to the very top. For those afraid of height, the last portion would seem to be very challenging. The awesome view of the surroundings will make the effort well worth it.

 

Mount Kinabalu – 4095m, Sabah, East Malaysia

5-8 October (Limited slots)

S$590 / pax (no expedition leader)

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Mount Kinabalu, standing tall at 4095m is not only the centerpiece of Kinabalu National Park – a UNESCO World Heritage site – but undisputable the most prominent mountain on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia.

Known to be one of the most accessible mountains in the world and open to trekkers all year round, tonsof people (estimated to be around 20,000), from around the world and Malaysia, of all ages and be it seasoned or novice trekkers make their way to Mt Kinabalu with the aim to reach its summit – the Low’s Peak – every year

 

 

AoTaiNa – 4800m, Sichuan, China

17-25 October

S$1430 / pax (with an expedition leader)

AotaiNa 1 AoTaiJi (奥太基 / 5300m), AoTaiMei (奥太美) / 5200m) and AoTaiNa (奥太娜 / 4800m) make up the SanAo mountain range (三奥雪山) on the eastern foot of the Tibetan Plateau in the Aba Tibetan Autonomous Region, Sichuan, China. Of the 3 peaks, only AoTaiNa (奥太娜 / 4800m) can be climbed. The terrain to the peak of AoTaiJi (奥太基 / 5300m) and AoTaiMei (奥太美) are too steep and dangerous.  It is possible to climb AoTaiNa (奥太娜) all seasons with each season showcasing different sides of the mountain. In spring, Rhododendron (杜鹃花) blooms in abundance while in autumn, the mountain range burst into  fiery colours of yellow, red, orange and brown and, in winter, it is transformed into a winter wonderland. Of the four seasons, AoTaiNa’s (奥太娜) peak is almost snow-free only in summer.

 

Everest Base Camp Trek – 5350m, Khumbu, Nepal

16 November – 3 December

S$2070 / pax (no expedition leader)

EBC

This expedition hopes to expand the story about ordinary people achieving extraordinary results by tracing the footsteps of the Everest climbers to the Base Camp.

Everest Base Camp trek is one of the best adventure trekking destinations in Nepal. The experience on the trek is everything an adventure traveler could ask for. The breath taking views of the snow-capped mountain ranges are simply undeniably attractive, and the experience of the daily routine of high altitude living offers individual an opportunity to discover the inner strength hidden within.

 

Island Peak – 6189m, Khumbu, Nepal

16 November – 7 December (Limited slots)

S$3800 / pax (with an expedition leader)

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Island Peak, also known as Imja Tse, is one of the most popular climbing peaks in the Everest region. It not only attracts trekkers who want to upgrade their climbing credentials from trekking to climbing a snow peak, Island Peak is also climbed by many experience mountaineers as acclimatization for higher peaks like Ama Dablam and even Mount Everest.

Standing at 6189m above sea level, Island Peak is a stand-alone-peak among the surrounding majestic peaks.  This mountain was named “Island Peak” in 1952 by a climbing team of Eric Shipton due to its striking location in the middle of the Chhukung valley, like an Island on a sea of ice.

 

Yushan+Xueshan – 3952m & 3886m, Taiwan

13-20 December

S$1390 / pax (with an expedition leader)

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The island of Taiwan has more than 100 mountains exceeding 3000m with the highest being Yushan (3952m) and 2nd highest being Xueshan (3886m). Both peaks are part of the famous “Top 100 Peaks of Taiwan” (台灣百岳). Yushan is also known to be the fourth highest mountain on an island and highest point on the Tropic of Cancer. Yushan is sometimes climbed together with Mt. Kinabalu in Malaysia and Mt. Fuji in Japan by trekkers to collect the special “Asian Trilogy” experience. As with almost all the mountain ranges in Taiwan, both mountains are located in central Taiwan with Yushan in The Yushan National Park in Xinyi, Nantou Country and Xueshan in Sheipa National Park in Dahu Township, Miaoli County.

雪山 (67)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ice Climbing Course, Sichuan, China

13-21 December

S$1690 / pax

Ice Climb pix

The ice climbing course is aimed at those with little or no winter walking experience who would like some training in winter mountaineering skills perhaps with a view to moving onto steeper ground.

You will learn to climb on vertical ice fall with the focus on developing good footwork, rope skills, and proper handling of ice equipment.

Some important techniques and practices common in rock climbing  that are employed in ice climbing include knowledge of rope systems, tying in, belaying, and lowering. Beginners should learn these techniques before attempting to ice climb.

Course will be conducted by Mr Lim Kim Boon, qualified mountain guide certified by Chinese Mountaineering Association (CMA) & certified Climbing Instructor Assessor with Singapore Mountaineering Federation (SMF), and the climbing coach and team manager of the Singapore Women’s Everest Team.

Pre-requisite:

SNCS Sport Climbing Course Level 1 (SCCL1 – one day course)*

Sign up with one of the following course providers:

  1. http://onsight.com.sg/2012/services/sncs-level-1/
  2. http://climb-asia.com/home/certified-courses/

*SNCS SCCL1 course fee is not included in the ice climbing course fee

* Complete the course before 12 Dec 2014